A tale of nature, wildlife and birding from Cheshire, North Wales and across the globe....

A tale of nature, wildlife and birding from Cheshire, North Wales and across the globe....

Tuesday, 14 April 2015

Ring Ouzels on the Great Orme

With a huge fall of Ring Ouzels documented throughout the UK from Friday onwards, and with up to 20 birds present on the Great Orme since Saturday morning, we decided to call in on the Sunday after returning from Scotland. Despite the absolutely howling gales and driving rain (which caused the car to rock from side to side with the sheer force of it all), and with the helpful directions from Alex’s friend Steve Culley, I eventually picked up 2 birds in flight and calling near the Copper Mines. I soon located a lot more birds further down the slope, all actively feeding in the same ivy tree, and despite the far from perfect conditions we counted 7+ birds.
Ring Ouzel - The Great Orme
A record shot of the male Ouzel
Ring Ouzel - The Great Orme
I was especially pleased to track down these birds as I haven’t had great views of Ring Ouzels before, merely a quick fleeting glimpse on a fence before a pair flew away on a visit to Moel-y-parc a few years ago, and a female by the side of the road whilst driving in Cheshire being my only other sightings, so it was great to watch these large thrushes going about their business at leisure, despite the absolutely horrific weather.
Ring Ouzels - The Great Orme
The driving rain made it hard to get even record shots!
Ring Ouzel - The Great Orme
Interestingly, Ring Ouzels haven’t been picked up from this side of the Orme before, with birds usually getting found on the opposite side in the sheep fields. However, the fields and patches of grass surrounding the Copper Mines and over towards the nearby houses seemed the perfect habitat for these migrants, and it was clear why they had all congregated in this one patch of trees – this sheltered spot offered a welcome respite from the harsh winds and abysmal weather.
Ring Ouzels - The Great Orme
All the birds had congregated in one tree - 4 can be seen in this one shot alone with another just to the left out of frame
The row of ivy trees in particular at the back of the donkey field next to the rubble track appeared to be the most favourable, and this little sheltered spot seems like it would pose an attractive area for migrants in the spring and autumn months – definitely an area to watch more closely in the future!

1 comment:

  1. definitely worth checking out - thanks for the info!

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...